Workforce Management

Safety and Stability

Organizations will need to execute thoughtful measures when managing the return to the office.

By Gretchen Alarcon

The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted the global workforce in ways that could have never been expected. HR professionals have been forced to take center stage, lead their organizations through unexpected changes, and define what’s next. But the hard work is not over yet.

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Appreciating More Than Achievements

Recognition is a key element of a post-COVID-19 employee engagement strategy.

By Marta Chmielowicz

With a dispersed workforce that operates at government facilities across the U.S., IT company T-Rex Solutions LLC already had the building blocks in place to manage remote workers before the advent of the coronavirus pandemic. But the crisis is putting massive strain on even the most prepared organizations. In fact, mental health provider Ginger reports that 69 percent of workers say this has been the most stressful time of their entire professional career, and 88 percent have experienced moderate to extreme stress over the past four to six weeks. For 62 percent, productivity has suffered as a result.

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Post-Pandemic Strategies

New research indicates how companies are planning to adapt their recruitment and return-to-work policies post-COVID-19.

By Larry Basinait

To better understand how companies are managing their workforce in the wake of the worldwide pandemic, HRO Today is conducting a series of pulse surveys. The HRO Today Coronavirus Knowledge Portal addresses how businesses and HR leaders are handling the outbreak. Because the office environment will continue to be severely impacted going forward, this brief report examines how HR will function in the new normal.

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At Home, Not Alone

Seven strategies that help maintain a strong company culture while managing a remote workforce.

By Livia Martini

Fostering a company culture has long been hailed as an important way to recruit and maintain the best talent within corporations. It has become so critical that “chief culture officers” are now common within many large corporations, and it has been a driving force in making companies like Google such an attractive place to work.

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Remote Control

Best practices for building work-from-home policies during COVID-19 and beyond.

By Sirmara Campbell

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, many employers have moved to a completely remote model to protect the workforce and prevent the spread of disease. Many of these employers have never had a 100 percent remote workforce, presenting challenges to management and employees. However, having specific policies in place to handle telecommuting can help now and when considering remote work in the future.

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Managing in Crisis

Two companies share how they are adapting their workplace policies to protect their employees and businesses from the impact of COVID-19.

By Simon Kent

The speed at which the coronavirus has moved around the world means that for many HR teams, the work of creating an action plan to protect their people has shifted from the hypothetical to the top priority almost overnight. According to Julie Provino, international HR expert and award-winning CEO and founder of HR consultancy VeryHR, HR teams must now provide support, policies, and frameworks to enable their organisations to act quickly, efficiently, and smoothly—no matter what happens as the situation evolves.

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Thinking Ahead

Employing neurodiverse talent can provide a competitive advantage, but this segment of the workforce requires special considerations.

By Simon Kent

Many organisations look to embrace different thinking as a means to attain a competitive edge. Indeed, tech giant Apple’s whole branding strategy at one point was “Think Different.” Today, that mantra has taken on a new meaning as businesses begin to view neurodiversity as the next stop on their diversity and inclusion agenda.

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Empowering Working Women

Japanese women face many obstacles returning to the workplace after having children.

By Michael Switow

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe would like to see women comprise a larger percentage of his country’s workforce. Faced with a shrinking labour pool as baby boomers and 1950s danso-generation men retire, Abe placed women at the centre of his growth strategy in 2013, declaring that he would create “a Japan in which women shine.”

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