Relocation

2017 HRO Today Baker’s Dozen: Relocation

By The Editors HRO Today's Baker’s Dozen rankings are based solely on feedback from buyers of the rated services; the ratings are not based on the opinion of the HRO Today staff. We collect feedback annually through an online survey, which we distribute both directly to buyers through our own mailing lists and indirectly by sending service providers the link to send to their clients. Once collected, response data are loaded into the HRO Today database for analysis to score each provider that has a statistically significant sample. For this survey, we required 10 responses from 8 companies. We reached out to more than 35 providers of relocation services. In order to determine an overall ranking, we analyze results across three subcategories: features breadth, deal sizes, and quality. Using a predetermined algorithm that weighs questions and categories based on importance, we calculate scores in all three subcategories as well as an overall score. The rankings are based on those scores.

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Pressure’s On

Organizations can expect costly fines—or worse—if they don’t follow the ever-changing rules of relocation compliance. By Russ Banham At the end of the last century, globalization resulted in an extraordinary uptick in the volume of employees on assignment abroad and the length of their stays. The tax, legal, and immigration rules limiting the duration of these assignments were different but difficult to enforce given the mass of assignees and their ebb and flow. Those days are long gone. Most countries today are stringently policing their rules and harshly penalizing companies for non-compliance. Stay too long in a country and risk a stiff fine or worse—incarceration and the permanent barring of the employee to conduct business in the country. The constantly shifting landscape of regulations across the world makes compliance even more problematic."Privacy, visa, and tax regulations are forever in flux, putting the onus on companies to stay on top of these changes," says John Fernandez, executive vice president at relocations services providerContinue reading →

Moving Ahead After Brexit

Experts tackle potential relocation issues and upcoming mobility challenges as the U.K. leaves the EU. By Belinda Sharr When Brexit unexpectedly happened in June 2016 and defied expert predictions (The Economist reported 85 per cent of polls said Britain would remain in the EU), many HR executives across the EMEA region were left wondering about the future—specifically how the announcement would impact relocation trends. Now that a few months have gone by, mobility strategies are taking shape as the U. K. plans its exit from the EU by March 2019. Whilst precisely predicting the future is impossible, experts are looking at current trends and making some suggestions that may help global companies navigate the new relocation process for their far-flung employees. Forward-thinking organisations are looking at next steps with regards to mobility because Brexit will affect employees they may have in the U.K., the EU, and beyond. Charlotte Sword, global head of human resources at U.

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Millennials on the Move

Younger workers are ready and willing to relocate. Use it to your benefit. By Tim O’Shea Twenty years ago, only a small percentage of the workforce—typically C-suite executives—expected to relocate for career advancement. Now the industry is seeing a significant shift toward younger employees relocating to grow professionally. It’s changing how organizations think about talent acquisition, retention, and development and how employees map their lives and careers. In fact, a new Wakefield survey for Graebel found that millennials are willing to relocate for work, believe mobility is essential for career advancement, are willing to postpone life milestones for professional development, and are highly independent. Where does this stem from? Millennials’ willingness to relocate is probably the result of the study-abroad programs they utilize to gain exposure to other countries and cultures during college. Eighty-four percent of millennials are willing to relocate for a job and 82 percent of millennials believe eventual relocation will be necessary for career advancement.

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Curbing Costs, Not Services

Ways to ensure organizations—and employees—get the most out of relocation.
Debbie Bolla
It’s no surprise that the cost of relocation continues to plague HR executives. With assignments costing organizations up to $85,000 for homeowners, according to Worldwide ERC, the pressure to stay on budget and show return on investment (ROI) remains critical. According to Brookfield Global Relocation Services’ 2016 Global Mobility Trends Survey, 96 percent of respondents report the push to decrease spend has become more important or is the same as last year. “Controlling mobility costs is crucial because many parts of our business are trying to work within limited budgets, and when they see how expensive it is to relocate someone or send someone on an international assignment, they often quickly change their minds,” says Jackie Blais, manager of enterprise mobility for global materials manufacturer Avery Dennison.

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HRO Today 2017 Resource Guide

We know that the readers of HRO Today magazine turn to us as a go-to resource in the HR industry that delivers trends, insights, and the top resources for all of their HR operations and service needs. In our annual resource guide, we aim to showcase providers and product vendors across 18 sectors of HR services.

Here, you will find providers of everything from recruitment process outsourcing (RPO) to benefits administration and multi-process HRO, not to mention a treasure trove of HR technology, consulting services, and other ancillary products.

We hope that our 2017 Resource Guide will serve you well as a starting point in your search for appropriate vendors.

View the 2017 Resource Guide here

Moving to the Next Level

Four strategies organizations can leverage to better align global mobility with talent management.

By Christa Elliott

In today’s competitive business environment, mobility is more than just relocating employees to new markets. It means creating a global business plan around the drivers and goals for annual relocations—and seeing beyond the bottom line in terms of measuring the efficacy of mobility programs.

Unfortunately, there is often a disconnect between global mobility efforts and larger organizational objectives for talent management, especially within large companies. This can make strategic, talent-oriented actions, such as hiring and benefit management,  difficult to synergize. There are several reasons for this disconnect, including a divided understanding of the purpose of global mobility function. In fact, new research from Brookfield Global Relocation Services suggests that while 46 percent of employees say that the primary role of global mobility is to support and serve relocated employees, another 44 percent believe that global mobility mainly exists to provide expert advice to stakeholders throughout the company.

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Mobile Millennials

The top three strategies for relocating—and retaining—younger workers. By Marta Chmielowicz As the labor pool becomes younger, more savvy, and more demanding of their employers, forward-thinking organizations are enlisting new mobility solutions that are more attractive to Millennials whose age and life circumstances make them ideal candidates for relocation. These changes are no surprise as younger workers have different priorities and expectations for job fulfillment. “Millennials tend to be good candidates for relocation because they have a different outlook on life and different expectations regarding their careers than prior generations have had,” says Paul Sorrentino, vice president of corporate partnerships for NuCompass Mobility Services. “They are willing to trade old-fashioned job security for new experiences and learning, and are more flexible about where they work and what they do, as long as they are having interesting experiences along the way. This makes relocation less daunting and more of an adventure to them.

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Moving to the Next Level

In today’s competitive business environment, mobility is more than just relocating employees to new markets. It means creating a global business plan around the drivers and goals for annual relocations—and seeing beyond the bottom line in terms of measuring the efficacy of mobility programs. Unfortunately, there is often a disconnect between global mobility efforts and larger organizational objectives for talent management, especially within large companies. This can make strategic, talent-oriented actions, such as hiring and benefit management, difficult to synergize. There are several reasons for this disconnect, including a divided understanding of the purpose of global mobility function. In fact, new research from Brookfield Global Relocation Services suggests that while 46 percent of employees say that the primary role of global mobility is to support and serve relocated employees, another 44 percent believe that global mobility mainly exists to provide expert advice to stakeholders throughout the company.

Continue reading →