Workforce Generations

Generation Next

Strategies to develop a holistic workforce strategy to attract younger talent and contingent workers.

By Vish Baliga

The pandemic has challenged companies to rethink their workforce strategies in profound ways, particularly with respect to remote work and gig opportunities. Much of the U.S. has become a work-from-home economy, with over 42% of the workforce now working from home or a remote location full-time. Many of the concerns associated with working from home have been addressed with the aid of new technologies and work practices. In fact, the pandemic-induced remote work environment has provided ideal conditions to validate the benefits of remote work for organizations, workers, and society at large.

A New Approach to TA

Turkcell’s digital process has revolutionised recruitment for early career talent.

By Marta Chmielowicz

Turkcell, the leading mobile phone operator in Turkey, realised that empowering today’s youth is critical to laying the groundwork for a more sustainable future. By engaging recent graduates and early career talent, the company tapped into a promising talent pool—a prospect that was especially enticing given that Turkey has the highest proportion of youth in the EU, with nearly half of its population under the age of 31.

Mental Health Check

New research shows the advantages of offering well-being benefits to the multigenerational workforce.

By Wendy Edgar

The rise of the multigenerational workforce brings a variety of opportunities for organizations and employees alike, especially when it comes to benefits offerings. What’s more, amid the current COVID-19 pandemic, people are looking to their companies for tools and resources to support their lives both inside and outside of work.

Are You Talking to Me?

An individualized approach to health and well-being benefits can drive engagement in a multigenerational workforce.

By Marta Chmielowicz

Facing rising costs of living and significant transformation in the world of work, today’s employees are more stressed than ever. In fact, 35 percent of all employees and 50 percent of millennials have seriously considered switching jobs due to stress. And employees increasingly expect their employers to address the stress issue, with 60 percent of survey respondents reporting that they feel it is important for companies to offer health and well-being resources that encompass physical, emotional, financial, and social health.

A Connected Culture

Ally Financial is redefining its benefits program to meet the needs of the modern family.

By Kathie Patterson

An organization’s culture and purpose are key driving factors in attracting and retaining talent, and this is particularly the case with top millennial and Generation Z workers. While all employees may want the same things regardless of age, younger generations are more vocal about what they need from their employers and have called on companies to be more thoughtful and willing to evolve with today’s changing society. Ally Financial strives to be open with its employees, listening to feedback in order to be better and do better for its workforce.

Ally Financial

Money, Motivation, Mobile Tech, OH MY!

New research uncovers some surprising preferences of Generation Z workers.

By Chas Fields

Generation Z workers may not be so different from the rest of us after all. A 2019 study from The Workforce Institute at Kronos, How to Be an Employer of Choice for Gen Z, uncovered the familiar—and at times contradictory—motivations and anxieties of Gen Z, the youngest entrants to the workforce. Regardless of education, location, or vocation, it’s clear that Gen Z workers are seeking the same things as the generations that came before: stability and recognition. However, there is one big caveat: Their hopefulness for success in the workforce is met with equally prominent anxiety.

Decreasing the Generational Divide

TD Bank shares its strategies to embracing a multigenerational workforce and creating a culture of collaboration.

By Marta Chmielowicz

A new phrase has gone viral on the internet and social media, bringing to light a fundamental disconnect between younger generations and baby boomers: “Ok, boomer.” And as it makes the rounds on social media, emerging in memes, hashtags, t-shirts, and even the halls of parliament, it is also increasingly making its way into the workplace—raising culture concerns that could have dire consequences for businesses.

The Start of Something New

Technological innovations and generational demands are poised to transform the way work is done in 2020 and beyond.

By Emily He

The future of work has been a hot topic in recent years, fueled by a barrage of technological advancements impacting nearly every industry and organization. Business leaders far and wide are being pushed to innovate or risk falling behind—and HR leaders are no exception. New developments in artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, and chatbots are shaking up the landscape for HR, raising concerns around automation and job displacement while forcing teams to adapt to changing employee expectations and evolving workplace norms.

Career Champions

Four HR leaders share how their approaches to mentoring programs are solving talent challenges.

By Marta Chmielowicz

Today’s employees are happier, more productive, and more engaged when their jobs bring intrinsic rewards, or the feeling of doing meaningful work that propels their personal and professional growth. In this environment, career development is no longer a perk reserved for certain high-ranking positions—it is an expectation.

Mentoring

Mind on Mobility

Short-term relocation assignments are emerging as a strategy to keep younger workers engaged and loyal to the organization.

By Marta Chmielowicz

Globalization is raising the bar on mobility. As technology strengthens economic and intellectual connections across the world, leading multinational companies are looking to develop a new generation of leaders with a global mindset and multicultural experience.

Short-term relocation
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