Benefits

Going Beyond Basic Benefits

Family-friendly benefits

Organizations are starting to offer packages that support the complex lives of employees.

By Marta Chmielowicz

Today’s employees do not leave their lives at the door—they bring their whole selves to work. And increasingly, they expect their employers to offer a diverse range of benefits that support them physically, emotionally, socially, and financially. From offering extended paid paternity leave to helping employees financially plan for their children’s college educations, organizations are beginning to embrace new and innovative family-friendly benefits.

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Meeting All Employees’ Needs

Disability

A robust absence and disability management program can ensure even nontraditional workers remain healthy and productive.

By Melissa Oliver-Janiak

Maintaining the flexibility that today’s workers demand comes with many challenges for employers. In particular for HR, the competitive economy is putting more pressure on organizations to be prepared when nontraditional employees (remote and temporary workers) experience a disability or absence issue. Developing a robust absence and disability management program is a critical and cost-effective way to help organizations address all employees’ health needs.

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A Better Back to Work

Disability Leave

These best practices can ensure a successful and long-term return from disability leave.

By Kristin Tugman, Ph.D.

Understanding the psychological impact of short- and long-term disability on employees can go a long way toward successfully bringing those workers back on the job. Organizations play a pivotal role in that process. While significant effort has been made to overcome the physical barriers that prevent individuals from returning to work, what is often overlooked is that disability can be as much a psychological event as it is a physical one.

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Wellness: The Next Generation

Wellness Benefits

Investing in a holistic well-being benefits strategy is a win-win for employees and employers alike.

By Ruth Hunt

Wellness has become a popular catchphrase. Employers are now truly seeing how well-being is contributing to organizational effectiveness and the bottom line, if only indirectly. While there is some debate about the most effective ways to demonstrate the ROI of traditional wellness, there is clearer evidence that a broader approach to well-being drives value on investment (VOI). Well-being programs also result in other qualitative benefits, such as enhanced perception of the organization as a great place to work, increased employee engagement, reduced distraction, and more.

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Future-Proof Payroll

Global Payroll

New research finds organizations are moving to cloud-based platforms for global and compliance capabilities.

By Pete Tiliakos

Payroll transformation has become a priority for many organizations, finds NelsonHall’s annual Next Generation Payroll Services study. Historically, payroll has long been treated as a simple cost center, and frankly, many payroll departments have gotten by with disparate and outdated—albeit reliable—platforms that lack global reporting capabilities and require burdensome manual processes. And in some cases, payroll has been overlooked when it comes to allocating funding to improve the operating model.

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CEO’s Letter: CHRO Compensation – What Drives the Market for HR Talent

HRO Today

By Elliot H. Clark

I live in Philadelphia and I remember the media hullabaloo about the compensation paid to the baseball star Bryce Harper to join the local team. As one grave-faced sportscaster put it, “Well, there is a market value to talent—this franchise just got the bill.” I decided two things right at that moment: First was to never take market economics lessons from a guy who reads game scores for a living, and second was to see if the research team at HRO Today could figure out what drives the salaries for top executives in human resources. You will find the summary report in our upcoming second annual CHRO Today special edition (published with October), but I thought I would give you a few highlights.

We pulled the publicly available data on the Fortune 500 and found the CHRO compensation data on 88 senior-level HR executives from those companies. With a sample size of nearly 18 percent, we felt we had enough data to do a very valid market analysis. We split the market into the Fortune 50, the Fortune 100, Fortune 200, and Fortune 500 bands. We also looked at correlations to salary, total cash compensation, and total non-cash compensation (stock options and grants).

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Decreasing the Gap

Gender Pay Gap

Faced with stricter pay reporting regulations, UK companies are implementing recruitment strategies to increase diversity.

By Simon Kent

The UK’s gender pay gap reporting regulations, which require organisations with more than 250 employees to publish their pay gap data, have revealed the significant and entrenched gender inequality that exists in the workplace. But on its own, the initiative is not enough to change the problems it highlights.

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On-Demand In Demand

Payroll Technology

Today’s technology developments can improve the ease and efficiency of payroll and rewards processes.

By Simon Kent

It’s a cliché but it’s true: There really is an app for everything. For employers, the 24/7 always-on, always-available level of service expected by customers is now also expected by employees. Just as banking hours have been replaced by a constantly accessible online portal, the idea that employees should wait until office hours to check their pay, rewards, benefits, and other work-related entitlements is becoming outdated.

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In the Right Direction

Pay Equity

Gender pay inequities exist but the gap is narrowing.

By Katie Bardaro

Gender pay inequities persist in 2019, but not necessarily in the way many people think. There is a lot of miscommunication and confusion about the gender pay gap, so let’s set things straight. PayScale leveraged pay data from 1.8 million employees to compare the overall median pay for women to the overall median pay for men and found that women earn 79 cents for every dollar earned by a man. When accounting for the intersectionality of race/ethnicity and gender, this pay gap ranges from 74 cents on the dollar (African American and Hispanic women) to 93 cents on the dollar (Asian women).

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