Tag Archives: Employee Engagement

A Better Back to Work

Disability Leave

These best practices can ensure a successful and long-term return from disability leave.

By Kristin Tugman, Ph.D.

Understanding the psychological impact of short- and long-term disability on employees can go a long way toward successfully bringing those workers back on the job. Organizations play a pivotal role in that process. While significant effort has been made to overcome the physical barriers that prevent individuals from returning to work, what is often overlooked is that disability can be as much a psychological event as it is a physical one.

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Confidence Beginning to Wane

Worker's Confidence Index

Worker confidence in the second quarter takes a hit in three of the four metrics.

By Larry Basinait

The Worker Confidence Index (WCI) for the second quarter of 2019 decreased by 5.8 points to 104.8, similar to the level in the second quarter of 2018 (104.3). An even sharper decline of 7.9 points occurred in the second quarter of 2017, suggesting seasonality as a possible cause of the drop.

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The Age of Collaboration

Workforce Generations

Today’s multi-generational workforce has a lot potential, but will only reach it if organisations can manage its many complexities.

By Simon Kent

A long history in the paper and packaging industry means the workforce at Mondi is extremely diverse. The company has operations in over 33 countries and creates paper and packing for large, fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) companies such as Nestle, P&G, and Unilever. According to Group HR Director Michael Hakes, many of the company’s 26,000 employees started with Mondi straight out of school and still make up an important part of its workforce some 40 years later. Naturally, this has created an age-diverse workforce that presents both benefits and challenges.

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The New Why Behind Work

Organizations need to provide a meaningful, human experience while fulfilling their purpose to succeed today.

By David Mallon

The “why” of work is shifting. People want meaning, and organizations may need to temper technology by focusing on the human element of work. Responding to a range of economic, social, and political pressures, organizations have been working to bring their inspirational corporate mission, vision, and values to life by operating as social enterprises as well as profit-making business enterprises. That means they are emphasizing corporate social responsibility, listening and responding to a wide range of stakeholders, stepping in to fill gaps where public programs and policies fall short, and generally playing an active role in society and operating with a higher purpose. But while serving this need is certainly part of what it means to be a social enterprise, it’s not enough on its own. To truly lead as a social enterprise, organizations must focus on the people within their four walls, as well as externally in society.

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Entrepreneurial Spirit

Entrepreneurial Talent

Fostering innovation and growth comes down to one thing: culture.

By Michael Switow

Guest lecturers in a Singapore classroom—it doesn’t matter if it’s a secondary school or tertiary institution, a large assembly or a small group—will find that hands are often slow to rise when it’s time to ask questions. The same is true in Hong Kong and other parts of Asia.

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2019 Baker’s Dozen Customer Satisfaction Ratings: Employee Engagement

HRO Today Baker's Dozen

We rank the top providers based on customer satisfaction surveys.

By The Editors

HRO Today’s Baker’s Dozen Customer Satisfaction Ratings are based solely on feedback from buyers of the rated services; the ratings are not based on the opinion of the HRO Today staff. We collect feedback annually through an online survey which we distribute to buyers directly through our own mailing lists and indirectly through service providers. Once collected, response data for all providers with a statistically significant sample size are loaded into the HRO Today database for analysis.

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CEO’s Letter: A “Disengaged” HR Service Sector

HRO Today

Be Elliot H. Clark

At the HRO Today Forum in May, many CHROs and top-level practitioners were disappointed to hear Dr. Peter Cappelli of the Wharton Center for Human Resources say during a town hall session that current research suggests that employee engagement scores don’t tell HR or executive leadership very much as a predictive tool for productivity. I have not reviewed that research personally, but I defended the employee engagement provider industry saying that engagement surveys are predictive of retention—no minor issue—and can help identify problems in line management. Conclusive “linkage research” between engagement and performance has been the holy grail of the OD profession for decades. But the employee engagement industry has a bigger problem to contend with than Dr. Cappelli questioning predictive value. That problem is: Their service is not very good.

HRO Today is publishing our first-ever Baker’s Dozen Customer Satisfaction Ratings for Employee Engagement this month, and overall, the “engagement” of engagement customers is low. There are few companies on the list that outperform their cohort, but generally, the scores for customer service are the lowest of any other HR service offering.

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Maximizing Potential

Employee Productivity

New research reveals the drivers and deterrents of employee productivity—and how employee benefits can help both.

By Susan Podlogar

Employee performance has been a main focus of organizations as the key ingredient for success. However, this is no longer enough. MetLife’s 17th annual U.S. Employee Benefit Trends Study (EBTS) found that employees across all generations are looking for support from employers both in and out of the workplace. As a result, if an organization wants to hit its potential, its employees must also be set up to hit their potential—at work and at home.

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ADP Research Institute Sets International Benchmark for Employee Engagement with its 19-Country Global Study of Engagement

Study uncovers what conditions at work are most likely to attract and keep workers:

  • Sixteen percent of employees around the world consider themselves fully engaged, revealing 84 percent of the global workforce is not working at its full potential.
  • Biggest driver of engagement is whether you work on a team: Employees who identify as part of a team are 2.3 times more likely to be fully engaged.
  • Trust is a foundation of engagement: Employees who trust their team leader are 12 times more likely to be fully engaged in their work.
  • The United Arab Emirates has the highest percentage of fully engaged workers at 26 percent, while China has the lowest with just 6 percent. Engagement in the United States sits at 17 percent.

Roseland, NJ – June 14, 2019 – As organizations strive to better understand the art of employee engagement in a highly competitive labor market, the ADP Research Institute’s 19-country Global Study of Engagement provides a global benchmark for engagement. The study reveals that 84 percent of workers globally are just “coming to work” instead of contributing all they could to their organizations as “fully engaged” employees.

The study surveyed more than 19,000 employees (1,000 per country in a stratified random sample) around the globe to measure their level of engagement and identify the work conditions most likely to attract and retain talent. The research indicates that working on a team improves engagement. In fact, employees who identify as part of a team are 2.3 times more likely to be fully engaged. However, “teams” are often not the same as what is reflected on the organizational chart. Of those employees who work on a team, 64 percent report they work on more than one team, and 75 percent report their teams are not represented in their employer’s organizational chart.

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