Tag Archives: Contingent Workers

Protect Your Assets

A consistent background screening approach is critical when hiring contingent workers.

By Marta Chmielowicz

With talent emerging as a top competitive differentiator, organizations are turning to non-traditional sources in order to secure the skillsets required for business growth, development, and agility. And the proof is in the numbers: Ardent Partners’ The State of Contingent Workforce Management 2017-2018 study found that 40 percent of today’s global workforce is comprised of non-employee talent, including independent contractors, freelancers, consultants, and temporary workers. These workers play a critical role in the way business is done, with HR professionals leveraging contingent labor to become more agile (71 percent) and fill critical skill gaps (54 percent).

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Temporary Moves

Relocation

Gig economy workers seek relocation opportunities, but job classification challenges and local regulations remain a barrier.

By Mary Stoik Dymond

The rising trend of professional gig work is shifting the boundaries on the permanent, full-time employment norm. In fact, some analysts are even predicting that more than half of workers will be contractors or gig workers in the near future (Nation1099). The composition of workplace talent is nearing a tipping point, and the global gig economy is only poised to grow.

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Contingent Connection

Engaging Contingent Workers

Organizations are increasingly turning to social media as a way to attract contract workers.

By Marta Chmielowicz

No matter the name—contractors, freelancers, consultants, or contingent workers—there is no denying that the gig economy workforce has seen a massive spike in recent years. According to Upwork’s 2017 Freelancing in America study, the contingent workforce in the U.S. now makes up 36 percent of the working population and is growing at a rate three times faster than the total workforce overall. At the current rate, the majority of workers in the U.S. will freelance within the next 10 years.

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