Talent Acquisition

In the war for talent organizations must develop a multi-layered talent acquisition approach in order to gain a competitive edge and attract coveted passive candidates. A talent acquisition strategy should be high-touch—engaging with candidates throughout the entire lifecycle from application to hire to onboard. Technology powers organizations to elevate the candidate experience. Social media channels offer the opportunity to deliver engaging content and reinforce employment branding to top talent.

Future-Proof Recruitment

Automation is set to take hold of—but not take over—the talent acquisition space. Here are some ways to prepare. By Christa Elliott Will top candidates be hired by robots in the near future? Not likely. Although 65 percent of Americans expect that within 50 years, robots and computers will do much of the work currently done by humans—according to a study from the Pew Research Center—these fears may be unfounded for those who work the talent acquisition space. The early phases of the hiring process can benefit from applying artificial intelligence (AI) technology, but recruitment will always need a human touch. Provided that recruiters do more than source and screen, they are unlikely to be entirely replaced by software. On the contrary, the automation revolution will make their jobs easier and allow them to do more. With the right preparation, organizations can use automation to their advantage—saving time, money, and strategic resources in the process.

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Passive Versus Active

A new research report examines how recruiters can best engage with both types of candidates.
The Editors
Today’s top recruitment challenge is no longer identifying and sourcing talent. It’s engagement: Keeping candidates interested and active throughout the recruitment process. A new research report, 2016 Candidate Engagement, from Hudson RPO and HRO Today, uncovers how recruiters and hiring managers are grabbing candidates’ attention and keeping it. The study examines the engagement techniques that hiring managers and recruiters report are the most effective and compares them to what candidates say are most effective.

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Great Minds

Our roundup of experts provides a critical look at what's to come in 2017. By Debbie Bolla Attracting and retaining top talent. Becoming an employer of choice. Engaging millennials. Leveraging technology and data for informed decision-making. These are just a few of the challenges that HR and talent acquisition leaders report they are currently facing. The pressure on HR to spearhead strategic business solutions has never been greater. In fact, according to a recent Visier survey, 79 per cent report their organisation can't succeed without a strategic CHRO and 78 per cent agree that company success is driven by a CHRO who contributes to business performance. What else does 2017 have in store? HRO Today Global had the opportunity to speak with some of the top leaders in their field at and after the HRO Today Forum EMEA about how HR can succeed in the new year. HRO Today Global: What are the main challenges facing HR in 2017, and what are some strategies to overcome them? Arne-Christian van der Tang: At TomTom, we believe that the main challenge facing HR and the workforce in 2017 is the not a new challenge—it's the ongoing war for talent.

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2016 Baker’s Dozen Customer Satisfaction Ratings: EMEA and APAC RPO

2016 Baker's Dozen Customer Satisfaction Ratings: Recruitment Process Outsourcing: EMEA & APAC By The Editors HRO Today's Baker's Dozen rankings are based solely on feedback from buyers of the rated services; the ratings are not based on the opinion of the HRO Today staff. We collect feedback annually through an online survey, which we distribute both directly to buyers through our own mailing lists and indirectly by sending service providers the link to send to their clients. Once collected, response data are loaded into the HRO Today database for analysis to score each provider that has a statistically significant sample. For this survey, we required five responses from a location in Europe, Middle East or Africa, or Asia Pacific. In order to determine an overall ranking, we analyse results across three subcategories: service breadth, deal sizes, and quality. Using a predetermined algorithm that weighs questions and categories based on importance, we calculate scores in all three subcategories as well as an overall score.

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China: Skill Shortage Meets Talent Surplus

Retention strategies and hiring for future potential are keys to recruiting success in the APAC region. Christa Elliott Being that the APAC region is home to nearly 60 per cent of the world's population, it should be no secret that Asia is a fertile hiring ground. But as with any large and underutilised talent pool, recruiting Asian candidates can come with its own unique set of challenges. This is especially true in China. In the current job market, recruiters may find that job seekers in China have an altogether different set of skills, needs, and job preferences than job seekers further west, or even potential hires in other Asian countries. Kimberley Hubble, global RPO leader for Hudson, cites the total vastness of the APAC area as a major challenge both for recruiters and companies hired to provide RPO. "[The] sheer number of countries to be covered in the APAC region and their very different talent challenges [creates a challenge]," she says. "Also, each country has very different talent challenges.

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Labour Pains

Face EMEA market workforce challenges directly and strategically to ensure future growth. Jo Faragher Whilst many professionals in Europe are still reviewing the potential implications of Brexit—the U.K.'s decision to exit the European Union—the EMEA labour market faces its own challenges in the coming years. On the one hand, a rapidly ageing workforce has left many HR professionals struggling with succession planning; on the other, they're coming to grips with new trends such as an increasingly freelance labour market and the potential threats and opportunities brought by automation. Different states in Europe—not to mention industry sectors—are dealing with individual issues. In Spain and Greece, for example, unemployment is more than 25 per cent of the working-age population. Brexit has led to political instability not only in the U.K., but also in other EU countries, with some considering their own referenda. But there are also shared challenges. "The ageing workforce is definitely a big deal in most European countries," says Peter Brown, a partner in the HR management practice at consulting firm PwC.

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Linking Talent To The Bottom Line

LinkedIn’s CHRO Pat Wadors shares how she invests in the workforce to drive HR and business returns.
By Debbie Bolla
LinkedIn has become known for being a great place to work. It sits among the ranks of organizations on Glassdoor and Fortune’s coveted lists of the world’s top employers. But it didn’t happen overnight—it happened with intent. That’s how LinkedIn’s CHRO and senior vice president of global talent organization, Pat Wadors, explains it. Also an HRO Today CHRO of the Year for 2016, the executive says the values-based organization provides a work environment in which employees strive to make one another great. And it’s working: LinkedIn’s employee engagement is in the top 5 percentile globally. HRO Today had the opportunity to speak with Wadors about today’s pressing issues: engaging talent, creating company culture, retaining millennials, and bringing innovation to HR. Here, she shares some of the secrets to her success.

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No Longer Coming Up Short

Healthcare organizations are leveraging mobility strategies to help fill their talent gaps. By Michael Krasman There has been a lot of buzz about the growing shortage of physicians in the U.S.—in fact, a deficit of as many as 90,000 physicians is predicted in the next decade, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges. This is an alarming development, especially given the unique recruiting challenges that the healthcare industry already faces. With demand steadily outpacing supply, this deficit poses a threat to recruiting and hiring initiatives for hospitals and healthcare providers across the nation. These metrics are indicators not only of what’s to come but also of issues that need to be addressed sooner rather than later, including the rise of hospital vacancy rates for physicians, nurses, and staff. “Texas healthcare facilities are dealing with a formidable deficit when it comes to the recruitment of emergency room physicians,” says Dr.

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Planning Ahead

Combat impending skill shortages and staffing challenges with strategic workforce planning. Dermot O’Brien It’s clear that the workforce is changing. As the U.S. unemployment rate holds steady under 5 percent, the competition for top talent has become fierce. Employers are complaining of a skills shortage, which could be attributed to under investment in employee learning and career growth, not to mention a failure to train younger staff to replace retiring employees. Simultaneously, technology and globalization are creating systemic changes in the way business is done, which can also impact staffing requirements. Now, more than ever, companies must rely on strategic workforce planning (SWP) to get ahead of staffing challenges and skills shortages in the workforce. Employers should identify the skills they will need to be successful and focus on cultivating those skills in current employees and hiring new staff to ensure these needs are met. But where should employers start and how can they anticipate these needs in advance? A new study, Strategic Drift: How HR Plans for Change, commissioned by the ADP Research Institute® and conducted by The Economist Intelligence Unit® provides valuable answers to these questions and four key trends around SWP: 1.

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The Mercer Report: Are You Ready For Change?

By Sharon Cunninghis A perfect storm is brewing in the healthcare benefits market. Be prepared. Employers are pivotal players in today’s healthcare system, but their role has remained remarkably passive. Yes, organizations absorb much of the cost of coverage, ensure that they are in compliance with the complicated requirements of the Affordable Care Act, and provide many of the tools their employees need as insurance consumers. However, a transformation is long overdue. Regardless of the fate of the ACA under a new Republican administration, nearly two-thirds of all insured coverage in the U.S. is provided by employers, who collectively spend nearly $1 trillion annually on health benefits for their work forces. Benefit cost increases outpace overall inflation, and 14.2 percent of payroll is allocated to healthcare benefits, according to Mercer’s National Survey of Employer Sponsored Health Plans. Healthcare is at the center of impending change. New tech-based entrants are adding more pressure to health plans, which are also facing consolidation pressures.

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